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Devin the Dude has to be one of the most honest rapper on the scene. He is not one to rhyme about things that he does not do, he’s just a guy who likes the ladies and his weed, which is reflected in his music. Suite #420 does not stray away from the usual script, probably being his best album since his debut The Dude.

On Suite #420, it seems that Devin is in his most comfortable state. For instance, on previous albums he always had a track or two that somehow linked him to the rest of the hip hop community or to prove that he makes hip hop music, if it was the form of guest appearances, production, or remakes, but this time around he does not do that showing that he is more comfortable with his status. Another thing is that he is more adamant about marijuana smoking. On the intro “Cultural Coffee”, various accounts from all walks of life in the form of audio vignettes are used to justify it; bringing up the question of legalization. This differs from his previous albums where he speaks on the enjoyment, but did not take a stand on its legalization. So the album goes on to speak on his habits with this underlining theme on tracks like “What We Be On” and “We Get High”, but it is on “Ultimate High” where the point is brought home with lines like, “D-E-V-I-N/C-O-P-E-L-A-N-D/Would give you my vices but see then you’ll try to send me/To jail, hell, for what, because I’m smokin’ that weed/Please, leave me alone, go find the coke and the speed…” In addition, with the previous mentioned lines and the track “All I Need”, marijuana is compared to narcotics debating how it is not that bad compared to the harsher drugs, once again, bringing up the question of legalization. Devin still keeps it right with the females with songs like “That Ain’t Cool”, discussing how ladies try to claim their territory by leaving distinguishable items behind after secret late night visits, but he more so uses his singing talent for his songs for the ladies on the outstanding “I Can’t Stand It”, “Where Ya At” and “Its on You”, proving that he can still create beautiful music without going outside his usual boundaries.

Overall, Suite #420 is a fantastic album that most of Devin’s hard core fans will appreciate, but does not go out of its way to find new listeners, which makes the album so great, by that it seems that Devin has accepted his cult figure status while making music for his niche audience, giving weight to the age old saying, “…its 4:20 somewhere…”

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